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Ben Hogan Ft. Worth 15 irons

53 posts in this topic

On 2/9/2016 at 0:42 AM, NiftyNiblick said:

My Hogans are gapped in five degree increments so they don't match up directly to standard iron numbers anyway.

Did you ever get the heads weighed?

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20* -- 246g

24* -- 254 

FW 15

28* -- 264

32* -- 273

36* -- 280

40* -- 287

44* -- 291

48* -- 292

52* -- 296

56* -- 297

60* -- 306

Current Hogan heads run a bit heavier than other manufacturers, as most other 28* heads I've seen are in the 258 gram range.  I can't say the same about Hogans made by Spaulding or Callaway, but old man Hogan's heads ran heavy too: I've seen a 28* 1953 Hogan Precision (the first model he manufactured) at 263 grams; the 28* in my 1973 Apex set weighed 262 grams.  If there is an attribute these heavier heads share it is that they feel more solid than soft--not hard, but solid, as if there's more mass (which there is).  The question I have is did the Hawk produce the lighter Apex shaft so that he could use a heavier head or vice versa?  Conversely, the 1998-99 Hogan/Spaulding Apex heads was forged by Epon using 1025 or 1030.  I think this head is lighter because although the grip weight and shaft weights are nearly the same (playing length was the same), my FW15 has a swingweight 2.5 points higher than the Apex.  That said, the 1998-99 is softer than the FW15.  The Epon P2 is far softer--wet marshmallow soft.  But for me, it was a bit too soft, as the resultant muted impact feel/feedback was not what I was looking for.  Maybe it's an acquired taste?  

Physically, the FW 15 is roughly 2mm shorter than the 1999 Hogan, FH1000, and P2 from heel-side groves to the furthest edge of the toe.  It the same length or 1mm longer than the MR-23 US Spec and MacGregor Muirfield 20th Anniversary, and 2mm longer than the Wilson FG-17.  For comparison, the FG-17 is 2-3 mm longer than the Miura Baby Blades.  The FW15 has the thickest topline of them all, and a deep face like the MR23 and FH1000.  It has more offset than the FG-17, MR-23, Mac M20, and less offset than the P2 and 1998-99 Apex.  I think it has a bit more offset than the FH1000.

I think the FH1000 launches the highest, and the FW15 is the most forgiving on mis**ts.  Even though the FH1000, Apex, and P2 have longer blades (and consequently, perhaps bigger sweet spots), the muscle design of the FW15 gives it a higher MOI.  I think it is the most stable during a mis**t, yet it is very workable.  And the V-Sole is great.



Edited by db2

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Interesting story on Hogan design here....  http://www.jeffsheetsgolf.com/hogan--past-projects


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